Job Descriptions

As an abattoir worker you’ll be part of a team responsible for managing the livestock slaughtering process and preparing the meat for sale.
This is an important and responsible job and you must absolutely ensure that all of the animals that you work with are treated and processed humanely.

As a dedicated account manager working in food manufacturing, you’ll often be the face of your company with a particular customer or principal contact for a specific product line.

Your customers may include buyers from major supermarket groups, foodservice organisations or restaurant groups....

You’ll be playing a key role in the finance department of your company and you’ll assist with the compiling and maintenance of financial records, processing of invoices, tax returns, and the preparation of company accounts.

You may also be involved with the handling of cash and the administration of the office that you work in.

In a larger food company, your role may be more specialised and, for example, you might deal with the company payroll or credit control.

You’ll be responsible for the smooth running of the farm business, dealing with accounts, budgets, salaries and other financial issues.
You’ll also likely be the first point of contact with suppliers and customers.
You’ll work closely with farmers, farm managers etc to ensure that all tasks are completed to schedule and in compliance with relevant legislation.
The job is a combination of everyday tasks and more complex management issues.

Working as an Agricultural Contractor means you’re a service provider for farmers who haven’t the resources available for certain roles.
You’ll likely be self-employed or perhaps have your own company and you may specialise in one area of the farm business, or have several areas for which you can provide services.
These different areas include crop spraying, applying fertiliser, harvesting, and working with animals.

As an Agricultural Inspector you’ll be helping to keep our food safe.
You’ll be responsible for monitoring and evaluating agricultural standards and ensuring that farmers are fully compliant at all times.
This could mean standards in health and safety, EU environmental legislation, animal welfare standards and farm assurance etc.
Most likely you will be employed by one of a number of government related agencies such as the Health & Safety Executive, Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs or the Red Tractor Scheme. Note that local equivalents to these bodies can exist in the devolved nations.

You’ll be working with a variety of types of agricultural machinery which help with soil preparation, planting of crops, harvesting and processing.

As well as operating the equipment you’ll be expected to maintain and clean everything to high standards of safety and hygiene; you may be required to undertake basic repairs as well.

You are likely to be employed either on a large farm or for an agricultural contractor.

As an Agricultural Scientist, you will conduct research of crops and animals aimed at improving farming techniques to enhance the efficiency and profitability of farm businesses.

This means conducting tests, collating and analysing samples, and compiling reports on any number of factors that affect agricultural production; you can then use these reports to inform farmers, seed suppliers etc of potential improvements to be made

You will also study the effects of different farming techniques, pests and varying environmental factors that also affect outputs.

The Agricultural Scientist will try and strike a fair balance between the economic concerns of the farmer and other conservation issues

Working as an agronomist you’ll be investigating ways of improving soil productivity to maximise the production of consistently high quality crops without harming the environment.

You’ll continually update your knowledge and recommend improvements for your farmer clients.

You’ll also be responsible for solving any problems that arise with crops and making sure that all government legislation is complied with.

As an Artisan Baker you’ll be baking a wide variety of breads, cakes and other bakery products from scratch.
You will likely be working for a small independent bakery or within a restaurant kitchen and you might even specialise in the baking of a certain type of bread or product.
Recent years have seen a greater demand for artisan products and this has led to a resurgence of a sector that was in decline, so the opportunities are increasing all the time.